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Урок 2. Word Order of Adverbs

Adverbs usually go after verbs but before adjectives, other adverbs and participles. They can be used in front, mid or end position in a sentence.

He speaks loudly. He is amazingly handsome. She runs very fast. Obviously they will never see her again. Mobile phones are extensively used nowadays.

Adverbs of manner go before the main verb, after the auxiliary verb or at the end of a sentence.
He easily answered the questions in the test.We are eagerly waiting for his call.

She acted childishly.

  • adverb + main verb
  • auxiliary verb + adverb
  • modal verb + adverb + auxiliary verb

When there is more than one adverb in the sentence, their usual order is manner — place — time.

  • subject + verb + (object) + manner + place + time
    He watched TV quietly in his room until 6:00.

When there is a verb of movement such as go, come or leave in the sentence, then the adverbs come in the following order: place — manner — time.

  • subject + verb + place + manner + time
    Ann was rushed to hospital suddenly an hour ago.

Adverbs of place and time usually go at the end of the sentence. Adverbs of time can go in the front position to emphasise the time.
Have you been here recently?
Every day he goes to the gym on foot.

When there is more than one time adverb, we usually put the more specific ones before the more general ones (time — day — date — year).
He was born at 22:15 on Monday, March 17th, 1958.

Adverbs of frequency (often, seldom, never, ever, usually, normally, scarcely, rarely, always,etc.) go after the auxiliary verb (be, have, do), but before the main verb.

  • auxiliary verb + adverb +main verb
    She has never travelled abroad

In short answers, however, we put them before the auxiliary.

  • adverb +main verb
    She never comes to work on time.
  • to be + adverb
    She is often late.

Adverbs of degree (absolutely, completely, just, totally, extremely, quite, seriously, very, etc.) go before the adjective or the adverb they describe.

  • auxiliary verb + adverb of degree + adjective / the adverb which it describes
    He’s absolutely hopeless at Maths.

When these adverbs describe verbs, they go before a main verb or after an auxiliary verb.
We quite enjoyed the film. I’ve quite finished.

  • adverb ( describes verb) + main verb

Absolutely, completely and totally can go in the middle or end position.
He completely forgot our appointment. or He forgot our appointment completely.

A lot, much, a little, a bit, awfully, terribly can go in the middle position (before adjectives) or end position (when they describe verbs).
I’m terribly sorry. My tooth hurts terribly.

The adverbs already, no longer, hardly, nearly, almost, still go in the middle position.

Henearly knocked the old lady down as he could hardly see her in the dark.

Sentence adverbs (probably, certainly, possibly, perhaps, maybe, clearly, luckily, etc.) go in any position: front, middle or end. The front position is the most usual, though.
Luckily, he didn ‘t crash into the tree. He luckily didn ‘t crash into the tree. He didn ‘t crash into the tree, luckily.

Certainly, possibly and probably usually go before the auxiliary or between two auxiliaries. He certainly didn’t do it. He couldn’t possibly have done it.

We use adverbs after action verbs and adjectives after linking verbs: appear, be, become, get, feel, look, seem, smell, stay, taste.
It tastes bad. She looked happy at the party. (Looked means ‘appeared ‘ here and is a linking verb .) She looked happily at the children.(Looked is an action verb here, not a linking verb, and ‘happily’ describes the action.)

 

Practice.

She has lived in England. (luxuriously/in a large house)
She has lived in luxuriously in a large house in England.

1. Rewrite the sentences, putting the adverbs in the right position.

 

2. Rewrite the text putting the adverbs in the correct place.

Did you know that listening to music while you exercise can increase the amount of time you’re able to exercise? (significantly) In a recent study, researchers chose a selection of songs and asked a group of joggers to listen to them. (carefully) They told the joggers to run in time to the beat of the music and stop only when they felt too tired to continue. (exactly) The results were interesting. (extremely) The researchers found that the joggers ran 15% longer than usual when they listened to the music. (almost) The joggers reported that listening to the music made them feel energetic and improved their mood, too. (greatly) So, what are you waiting for? If you don’t listen to music when you exercise, why not bring along your MP3 player the next time you go jogging or go to the gym? (normally) You’ll be surprised with the results! (probably).

Ответ:

Did you know that listening to music while you exercise can significantly increase the amount of time you’re able to exercise? In a recent study, researchers carefully chose a selection of songs and asked a group of joggers to listen to them. They told the joggers to run exactly in time to the beat of the music and stop only when they felt too tired to continue. The results were extremely interesting. The researchers found that the joggers ran almost 15% longer than usual when they listened to the music. The joggers reported that listening to the music made them feel energetic and greatly improved their mood, too. So, what are you waiting for? If you don’t normally listen to music when you exercise, why not bring along your MP3 player the next time you go jogging or go to the gym? You’ll probably be surprised with the results!

 

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